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Kalispell Regional Medical Center

Drainage Tubes

KRMC Interventional Radiology
Interventional radiologists can place a variety of drainage tubes or permanent catheter drains. Following surgery or due to abscess, it is sometimes necessary to drain fluids from the site. A drainage tube may be placed to provide short-term or long-term relief.

Drain

The interventional radiologist will attempt to drain as much fluid as possible, but may have to leave a drain in place if the area is large or the drainage is ongoing. After placement, the drainage tube may be connected to a drainage bag or a Jackson-Pratt (JP) bulb.

How to Prepare
  • You may need to have blood drawn in advance of your procedure. If you have more than one procedure, you may have blood drawn each time.
  • A nurse may call you the day before your procedure to review your medications and any last-minute instructions.
  • Do not eat anything for six hours before your procedure.
  • Bring someone to drive you home.
What to Expect
  • If the drain is placed because of an abscess close to the surface of the skin, the interventional radiologist will use local anesthetic to numb the incision area.
  • If the abscess site is deeper, you may receive sedation during the procedure and then have a short recovery period in the holding room.
After the Procedure
  • You will receive specific discharge instructions from the interventional radiology staff.
Videos are provided only as a general reference and are not the property of Kalispell Regional Healthcare or a comprehensive overview of your specific procedure. Talk with your doctor before making any decisions about your treatment.

Asept Catheter

An asept catheter is a tunneled catheter that may be placed when a patient requires frequent drainage of pleural fluid from the lungs or ascites from the abdomen.

How to Prepare
  • You may need to have blood drawn in advance of your procedure.
  • A nurse may call you the day before your procedure to review your medications and any last-minute instructions.
  • Do not eat anything for six hours before your procedure.
  • Bring someone to drive you home.
What to Expect
  • The procedure begins with an assessment and an IV start in the holding room before going to the interventional radiology lab.
  • You will be sedated and will receive an antibiotic before the procedure.
After the Procedure
  • You will receive specific discharge instructions from the interventional radiology staff. A family member or support person should be available to learn about the drainage system.
Videos are provided only as a general reference and are not the property of Kalispell Regional Healthcare or a comprehensive overview of your specific procedure. Talk with your doctor before making any decisions about your treatment.

Alcohol Ablation

An alcohol ablation is used to treat recurring cysts or benign lesions. The alcohol acts as a caustic agent to roughen up the walls of the cyst and eventually shrink the cyst.

How to Prepare
  • You may need to have blood drawn in advance of your procedure.
  • A nurse may call you the day before your procedure to review your medications and any last-minute instructions.
What to Expect
  • The procedure usually begins with an assessment and an IV start in the holding room before going to the interventional radiology lab.
  • In the lab, the radiologist injects a predetermined amount of pure alcohol into the cyst.
  • You may be asked to turn from side to side to allow the alcohol to touch all walls of the cyst.
  • After a predetermined amount of time, the alcohol is drained from the cyst.
After the Procedure
  • If you require multiple treatments, you may be sent home with the alcohol still in the cyst. You will receive instructions on how and when to drain the alcohol solution.